Motorcycle Battery Not Charging: What to Do?

A motorcycle battery is a lead-acid accumulator that is specially designed to power the ignition system of a motorcycle. It is typically a 12-volt battery with three or four cells. The motorcycle accumulator is typically mounted under the seat or in a sidecar.

The motorcycle battery is a key component of the motorbike ignition system. It provides power to the spark plugs that ignite the fuel in the engine. It must be powerful enough to provide enough voltage to the spark plugs to ignite the fuel.

Without a working battery, your motorcycle won’t start and you’ll be stuck on the side of the road. That’s why it’s so important to keep track of your battery’s level and make sure it’s always charged.

Reasons Why a Motorcycle Battery is Not Charging

One of the most common problems with motorcycle batteries is that they will not charge. This can generally happen for several reasons, such as a dead battery, problems with the alternator, or a faulty regulator.

battery is dead

When it comes to motorcycle batteries, one of the most common issues is that they simply don’t seem to charge. There are a number of potential reasons for this, and it can be frustrating to try and figure out what’s wrong. However, by troubleshooting the issue, you should be able to get to the bottom of it and get your battery charging again.

Battery Is Dead

A dead motorcycle battery can be a huge inconvenience. If you’re out on a ride and your accumulator dies, you’re stuck. You might be able to get a jump start from another vehicle, but that’s not always possible. And, if you’re not near another vehicle, you’re out of luck.

There are several things you can do to prevent your motorcycle battery from draining:

  1. Make sure that you maintain it properly.
  2. Try to keep it from completely discharging.
  3. Keep your motorcycle out of the sun.
  4. Use a discharger when the motorcycle is not in use.

If you are unlucky enough to have a dead motorcycle battery, there are a few things you can do to get it working again. First, try charging it. You can do this with a battery charger or a 12-volt starter.

Second, try recharging it. This can be done with another car or with a battery jumper.

Finally, try swapping it out for another motorcycle accumulator. In this case, you can check out the top of the best lithium motorcycle batteries for your bike.

Reasons for a Dead Battery

There are a few reasons why a motorcycle battery might be dead.  One common reason is that the battery has simply run out of juice and needs to be replaced.

Another reason could be parasitic discharge. This is when a small amount of electrical current is constantly flowing through the battery even when the motorcycle is not in use. This can be caused by a faulty electrical system or a bad alternator.

If it is completely drained, it might also be due to a corroded battery terminal.

The Alternator Is Not Working

If you’re a motorcycle rider, you know that having a working alternator is essential. But what do you do when your alternator stops working?

Well, first of all, you should check the battery to make sure it’s still charged. If it is, then the problem is most likely with the alternator. In that case, you’ll need to take the bike to a mechanic to have it repaired.

Alternators are essential for charging the battery and running the electrical system on a motorcycle. When they stop working, the bike can’t run properly. So if your alternator isn’t working, you need to get it fixed as soon as possible.

Reasons

There are many potential causes for a motorcycle alternator not working.

  1. One of the most common causes is a bad connection in the wiring harness. This can be caused by a wire that has been damaged, or by corrosion.
  2. Another common cause is a faulty alternator. This can be caused by a defective alternator rotor or stator, or by a bad connection in the alternator wiring.
  3. A third common cause is a problem with the battery. This can be caused by a defective battery, or by a problem with the charging system.
  4. Finally, a problem with the voltage regulator can also cause the alternator to not work.

When a motorcycle battery dies, it’s easy to assume that the accumulator is at fault. However, it’s more likely that the alternator isn’t working properly. Here’s how to tell the difference.

If the motorcycle battery dies when the engine is off, it is likely at fault. If it dies when the engine is running, the alternator is likely at fault.

To test the alternator, start the engine and turn on the headlights. If the headlights get brighter when the engine is running, the alternator is working properly. If the headlights get dimmer, the alternator is not working.

Regulator – Rectifier Is Damaged

If you’re a motorcycle rider, you know that your bike’s electrical system is essential for running the ignition, fuel injection, and other electrical components. The electrical system is made up of a battery, voltage regulator, rectifier, and other related components. If any of these components fail, your bike may not run at all.

One of the most commonly failed motorcycle electrical components is the voltage regulator. It is responsible for maintaining the correct voltage to the bike’s electrical system. If it fails, the bike may not run or may run poorly.

The rectifier is another critical component of the electrical system. The rectifier converts the AC current from the alternator to the DC current needed by the electrical system. If it fails, the bike may not run or may run poorly.

How to Diagnose

how to diagnose a battery

One of the most common causes of voltage regulator and rectifier failures is damage from a voltage surge. A voltage surge can be caused by a number of things, including a shortage in the electrical system, a bad alternator, or a lightning strike.

If your voltage regulator or rectifier fails, it’s important to replace them as soon as possible. A failed voltage regulator or rectifier can cause extensive damage to the bike’s electrical system.

There are several things you can do to determine if the regulator rectifier on your motorcycle is broken. The first is to check the battery voltage. With the engine off, the voltage should be about 12.6 volts. If the voltage is below 12 volts, the regulator rectifier may be faulty.

Another way to test the regulator rectifier is to measure the resistance between the battery’s positive and negative terminals. With the engine off, the resistance should be around 0.5 ohms. If the resistance is higher than 0.5 ohms, the regulator rectifier may be bad.

A Blown Fuse in the Motorcycle

There are a few ways to determine if a fuse is blown on a motorcycle. One way is to use a multimeter. Another way is to use a test light.

If you are using a multimeter, you will need to remove the fuse from the fuse box. Once the fuse is removed, you will need to place the black lead of the multimeter on the metal part of the fuse and place the red lead of the multimeter on the end of the fuse. Once you have done this, you will need to turn on the multimeter and look at the reading. If the reading is not zero, then the fuse is blown.

If you are using a test light, you will need to remove the fuse from the fuse box. Once the fuse is removed, you will need to attach the test light to the end of the fuse. Once you have done this, you will need to turn on the test light. If the test light does not light up, then the fuse is blown.

Steps to Replace a Blown Fuse

A blown fuse is indicated by a lack of power to some or all of the systems on the bike. There are a few ways to tell if a motorcycle fuse is blown and not the battery.

One way is to check the fuse box. The fuse box is usually located near the battery. It will have a diagram on the cover that shows which fuses control which systems. If a fuse is blown, it will be obvious because the fuse will be missing or the metal strip inside the fuse will be broken.

Another way to check if a fuse is blown is to test the fuse with a continuity tester. A continuity tester is a device that tests for electrical continuity.

If a fuse is blown, it will not have continuity and the tester will not beep or light up.

Once you’ve identified the blown fuse, remove it and replace it with a new fuse of the same amperage. Make sure that the new fuse is the correct type for your motorcycle. Put the fuse box lid back on, and you’re done.

Wires In Charging Circuit

If your motorcycle isn’t charging or is charging intermittently, there could be a problem with the charging circuit. The first step in diagnosing the problem is to determine if the problem is with the wiring or with the charging system itself.

To check the wiring, start by disconnecting the battery and removing the fuse for the charging system. Then, using a circuit tester, check the voltage at each point in the circuit. The voltage at each point should be the same. If not, there is a problem with the wiring.

If the wiring is okay, the next step is to check the charging system. Remove the fairing and the battery cover. On most motorcycles, there is a voltage regulator mounted on the side of it. The voltage regulator is usually a small, square box with a few wires coming out of it.

Using a voltmeter, check the voltage at the output of the voltage regulator. The voltage should be between 13.5 and 14.5 volts. If the voltage is outside of this range, the voltage regulator is bad and needs to be replaced.

The following guide will show you how to replace the wire in the charging circuit.

  • First, you will need to remove the seat and the gas tank. Next, remove the side covers and the air cleaner. Then, remove the two bolts that hold the alternator in place.
  • Once the alternator is removed, you will be able to see the charging wire. Remove the connector from the wire and then remove the wire.
  • Next, you will need to cut the new wire to the correct length. Strip the insulation from the wire and then crimp on the connector.
  • Replace the wire in the charging circuit and then replace the alternator. Reinstall the seat, the gas tank, the side covers, and the air cleaner.

Maintenance Of A Battery

Motorcycle batteries are not as common as car accumulators, so some people don’t know how to take care of them. Here is a list of how to take care of your motorcycle battery:

  1. Do not let it run out of power. This is the number one rule of motorcycle accumulator care. If you let it run out of power, it will eventually die.
  2. Keep it clean. Dirt and grime can accumulate on the battery and eventually corrode it. Wipe it occasionally with a damp cloth.
  3. Keep the battery dry. If it gets wet, it will corrode. Store it in a dry place when not in use.
  4. Use the correct type of accumulator. Not all batteries are created equal. Make sure you use the correct type for your motorcycle.
  5. Store the battery in a cool place. An accumulator that is stored in a hot place will eventually die. Store it in a cool place instead.

FAQ

How long does a motorcycle battery last?

A motorcycle battery can last anywhere from 2 to 5 years, depending on the make and model of the accumulator, the type of riding you do, and the weather conditions.

How often should you check the battery?

It is typically recommended to check a car battery every 30 days.

Can a dead motorcycle battery be recharged?

It can be recharged, but it may not hold a charge for very long. It may need to be replaced.

Conclusion

Overall, motorcycle batteries generally do not need to be charged as often as car batteries, but if you notice that your motorcycle’s battery is not holding a charge or is losing power quickly, it may be time to give it a boost.

When a motorcycle battery dies, there are a few methods that can be used to revive it. The first option is to charge the battery using a trickle charger. If this does not work, then the next step would be to try and jump start the battery using a car battery. If jump starting does not fix the issue, then it is likely that the battery will need to be replaced entirely.

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